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CRCC breeder members

CRCC breeding members have agreed to respect the Club’s code of ethics and values. The Club does not carry out any verification of conformity and is not responsible for the acts or actions of its breeding members. The list of breeders made available to the public is not a substitute for due diligence on the part of the adopter.

The article is intented for this purpose.

In alphbetical order

List of our regular breeder members

Félin Insolite

Josée Charlebois
félin.insolite@hotmail.com
Québec

Mes Fantaisies

Nathalie Michaud
nalie.michaud@hotmail.com
Québec

Rexpertise

Michelle Giguere
info@rexpertise.ca
Québec

Heatwave

Cheryl McGee
crexndobes@gmail.com
Tennessee, USA

Ô-Minouches

Magalie Ouellet
info@chatterie-o-minouches.com
Québec

Rexquise

Stéphanie Parenteau
chatterie@rexquise.ca
Québec

Icenisphynx

Christina Clarke
baconsclarkes@telus.net
Colombie Britanique

Rexami

Hélène Racine
hylane@hotmail.com
Québec

Breeders in probation for 12 months

List of our associated breeder members

GypsyRex

Andy Godbout
andy.ag.godbout@gmail.com
Québec

Zéra

Annie Desruisseaux
inouk08@hotmail.com
Québec

Les P'tites Bêtes

Anne-Julie Boucher
elevagelesptitesbetes@hotmail.fr
Québec

JudyRex

Judy Gormley
judyrexcornish@gmail.com
Québec

Rex Cornus

Karine Levasseur
levasseur.kar@gmail.com
Québec

How to choose your cat breeder

Your decision is made; you have decided to adopt a Cornish Rex cat. It’s time to move on to the next step: Choosing your breeder. This is a particularly daunting question because what is considered good for one is not necessarily good for all. The criteria are different and the priorities are specific to each person. Let’s take a closer look and ask ourselves some fundamental questions …

Do you want a purebred cat?

Your breeder must be a member of a feline organization and register his adult cats as well as his kittens. Under the law, a cat that is not registered is not considered purebred. Do not be fooled.

Did you know that the only two Canadian purebred cats registration associations in Canada are the CCC and the CCA-AFC? All other associations are foreign. If you buy a registered cat from a foreign association, it is not listed in the genealogical records of it's own country of birth. In case of a dispute, it becomes difficult for the buyer, if not impossible, to obtain support from the foreign association.

Did you know that CCC (Cats Canada Cats) requires that all cats and kittens be micro-chipped before issuing registration certificates? By the same token, cats get extra security by being registered on the Canadian Pets Home Today database, which will help them find them more easily should they get lost. The microchip also helps prevent fraud on registration papers. Make sure that the microchip number of the kitten you adopt is on the registration certificate that you will be given. That is very reassuring.

Do you want a cat that faithfully represents it's breed standard?

Adopt a kitten of a breeder who takes care in rigorously selecting his breeding cats based on the established breed standard. It is not because a cat has curly hair that he is necessarily a purebred Cornish Rex. The shape of the head, body, profile, legs, position of ears, eyes etc. All this is part of the things to consider. Even if the cat is registered, it may not correspond to the breed standard because the breeder has made a bad selection of his breeding adults. Perhaps they are breeding for the sole purpose of selling kittens ...
Do not make a hasty reservation or buy impulsively as you may later regret it. The goal is not simply to produce perfect kittens, but it is to preserve the breed and its standard.

Did you know that feline exhibitions are held several times a year, where breeders can present their cats and get opinions from several qualified judges? It is a way of maintaining a correct standard and, above all, it is a resource for the breeder who needs advice, counseling or just a pat on the back

Do I want to adopt a well socialized kitten with good temperament?

Adopt a kitten from a breeder who keeps her kittens at the cattery with their mother and other cats until a minimum of 12 weeks, ideally 14, as recommended by all specialists in feline behavior. Maternal education is paramount to the health and psychological balance of the kitten. Favor a breeder who rears her kittens a free environment where the kittens can learn normal family life with all it's associated stimuli. A kitten raised in a secluded room, in a place far from the heart of the house, will be more timid, fearful, and nervous.

Do I want to see the environment my kitten is living in?

Adopt a kitten from a breeder where you can meet the parents and make sure they are sociable and of appropriate temperament. Ask to visit the place where the kittens live and also the other adult cats. Do not be surprised if the breeder refuses to give visits without the prior placing of a deposit on the waiting list. Understandably, they can not spend their weekends receiving visits. Professional breeding is not profitable and most breeder have an outside job as well as a family life.

Did you know that since 2015 there is an animal welfare organization that provides a breeder certification program, assistance for the improvement of living conditions and care, as well as clear guidelines in regards to animal welfare? For more information, visit the Anima-Québec website (www.animaquebec.com).

Do I want to adopt a healthy cat?

Adopt a kitten from a breeder who tests for genetic diseases associated to his breed. Ask to see the results of the tests that must come from research centers verified and accepted by the scientific community. Do not just rely on the word of the breeder.

Did you know that for the time being, three known genetic diseases are listed for the Cornish Rex?

HCM (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy): This disease is a syndrome including many genetic and non-genetic conditions affecting many species including the cat, including the Cornish Rex. There is currently no genetic screening for the Cornish Rex. Only cardiac ultrasound assessments are recommended by veterinary cardiologists and this practice is still controversial.

PRA (progressive retinal atrophy) disease causing progressive vision loss.

PKD (polycystic kidney disease): small cysts develop on the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure.

There are genetic tests that are easily accessible to breeders to detect these last two diseases. Professional breeders have the moral responsibility to breed only from cats free from these diseases.

Is it important for me to adopt a kitten with a good health guarantee?

Adopt a kitten from a breeder that offers a clear and precise guarantee.
Do not hesitate to ask questions. What will happen if my kitten gets sick in the days following adoption? Who will pay for veterinary expenses? What will be the modalities? What will happen if my kitten develops a genetic disease? A congenital disease? What will happen to my kitten? What will my options be at that time? Remember that these are often very emotional decisions and it is easy to play with the feelings of people when unfortunate situations arise.

Did you know that a viral, bacterial or parasitic infection can go unnoticed and that a simple stress can activate / reactivate it? Your breeder should be able to tell you openly and his guarantee should be based on the risks to which the kitten is exposed to the cattery but also in his future environment. Aim for a guarantee for infectious diseases of 10 days and more.

Did you know that the terms 'genetic' and 'congenital' do not mean the same thing? Genetic means that the disease is transmitted by the genes of the parents, whereas congenital means that the disease is present at birth (manufacturing defect during the development of the kitten in the uterus).

Did you know that several protozoa / viruses / bacteria can contaminate cats stools and that only DNA-based tests can detect them? Simple conventional stool tests only identify a very limited number of these infectious agents.

You must be comfortable accepting the terms of the contract, otherwise your only recourse will be small claims court in case of litigation.